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I’m very pleased w/myself. 🙂

if the hell I’ve been through (and put my family through) for the last 2 yrs has put me in a position to be able to help just one woman, then I think I’ve earned the right to be pleased w/myself (but I’ll be careful not to break my arm while I’m patting myself on the back 😉 )…

over the last couple of days, I’ve had an opportunity to have a public exchange (in the PMDD support group that I co-own) w/a woman who sounded so totally beyond despair that I was honestly quite afraid for her; we delved into the remedies she’s using to try to effect some relief from the symptoms of her severe PMDD, and it wasn’t too long before I was able to discover what I believe her problem is: the wrong kind of progesterone cream… see, not all OTC natural progesterone creams are created equal, and in the hope that what I shared w/this woman may benefit someone else out there, I’m going to reprint my explanation to her re: progesterone creams here on my blog (I’m withholding the name of the “problem” progesterone cream b/c 1) not everyone will have problems with it, and 2) I have no desire to bias anyone against it, only to educate people in generalities and how to apply them, so the name of the “problem” cream really is irrelevant for my purpose here):

I looked up XYZ progesterone cream and went straight to the ingredients list, and what jumped out at me first of all is the burdock root extract — burdock root is ESTROGENIC, and it will almost invariably and unavoidably counteract the effects of the progesterone content! in addition, certain species of ginseng are also suspected of being phytoestrogens, but I’ve had difficultly finding consistent, reliable information in which the suspect species of ginseng are clearly identified, so the ginseng in this cream (which doesn’t identify the particular species of ginseng, and that’s actually a violation of federal labeling laws, but I digress) *could* also be contributing to the problem, but I’ll bet the main culprit is the burdock root… the other extracts — evening primrose oil, chamomile, lavender — are more for “label appeal” than anything, as they offer no direct hormone-balancing benefit to the user, nor do they have any effect on the stability of the emulsion or act as a preservative, etc… (just fyi, I grew up in a household where herbal remedies were de rigueur, and over a year ago now I started doing EXTENSIVE, serious research into herbs, extracts, essential oils, distillates, etc. while looking for a solution for my own PMDD; not only have I accumulated a pretty decent print library, but I’ve got oodles of web bookmarks, and I also belong to two major microformulator forums where I’ve been able to learn even more about the application of natural materials in personal care and herbal medicine, so I actually do know quite a lot about plant estrogens, etc.) anyway, that’s one of the reasons I researched the heck out the progesterone creams out there and finally settled on Natpro: there’s NOTHING in there except the progesterone, other than the ingredients that make up the lotion itself, including emulsifiers, stabilizers, and a paraben-free preservative system; however, if you have nut allergies, Natpro won’t work for you b/c it’s in a macadamia nut oil base (and yes, it does have a lovely nutty smell that disappears pretty quickly after application)… also, the progesterone content of Natpro is considerably higher than XYZ’s cream: 33.33mg/g, which works out to ~143mg/day based on manufacturer-recommended dosing of ~1/2 tsp 2x/day for 14 days, as opposed to the 20mg/day dosage of the XYZ progesterone cream — Natpro’s content and dosage combination delivers over SEVEN TIMES as much progesterone as the XYZ formula…!

two other contributing factors in my decision to buy from Wray were 1) her EXCELLENT explanation of the very subtle molecular differences between natural hormones (estrogen vs testosterone) and between natural and synthetic hormones (progesterone vs progestin), and 2) her full disclosure and very detailed explanations of what ingredients she includes in her formula and why… the only drawback to the Natpro cream is that it doesn’t come in a pump dispenser, so you do have to eyeball or otherwise approximate the doses (but that was easy-peasy for me b/c I love to cook and I’m always eyeballing herbs, seasonings, etc. <g>), but like I explained in my previous post, the progesterone content of the Natpro is SO much higher than most of the other OTC progesterone creams out there, I seriously doubt that it’ll be a big deal if you don’t get EXACTLY 1 tsp of cream (btw, the recommended dosage on the packaging is something like 1 tsp/day for the 14 days before your period unless you’re menopausal, but I found that 1/2 tsp 2x/day worked better for me — it’s actually a pretty forgiving product)… it’s available via Priority Mail, so if you order it tomorrow, it’ll be at your door well before your next PMDD phase kicks in…

it was so exciting over the course of this exchange to see this woman’s attitude shift from complete hopelessness to a glimmer of hope — to be a part of that, even to be the catalyst for it, was totally amazing, and like I said earlier, it makes me feel like the nightmare I’ve lived through was worth it if I can help just one other woman…

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